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PVRWIREhttp://sitecorecms.bsu.edu/?sc_mode=edit&sc_itemid=%7b58179E25-E29B-4773-96ED-7126D8B35B70%7d&sc_lang=en

So it turns out all the sky is falling talk about how PVR technology makes it easy for consumers to ignore commercials might be beside the point. People just don’t want to watch commercials, and just because they’re not skipping through them doesn’t mean they’re paying attention.

Researchers at Ball State University’s Center for Media Design report that about viewers interrupt about 45 percent of commercial breaks by changing channels, checking out the electronic program guide, or just getting up and walking out of the room.

Viewers in the study did watch about a third of television commercial breaks completely from start to finish. But with nearly half of the ad breaks were watched for 60 seconds or less. Apparently flipping channels is a favorite way to avoid commercials — about half of those who weren’t paying attention to a commercial break had switched to another channel, while less than 20 percent actually bothered to get up from the couch and go anywhere.

Advertisements

AD Job http://www.adjab.com/2006/09/29/old-fashioned-commercial-skipping/

by Chris Thilk

Here’s a newsflash, in the form of a research study, for advertisers: You have a problem with people skipping TV commercials that’s entirely divorced from the DVRs you fear so much. Lost Remote passes on the findings of a study conducted by Ball state’s Center for Media Design that shows 45 percent of commercial breaks are avoided either by channel changing, checking out the program guide or – and this one’s the real shocker – leaving the room. People are also talking to others in the room or engaging themselves with another medium such as flipping through a magazine when the commercials are on. Just over 30 percent of the ad breaks measured were watched in their entirety and almost half were watched for a minute or less. Since so many of the “scene shifts,” as the study calls them occur in the first minute of the commercial break that puts a heavy amount of pressure on the first ad in the break. Basically that one needs – absolutely needs – to hold the attention of the viewer for the rest of the spots to even stand a chance.

So here’s a thought for you: Stop worrying about ways to foil DVR usage or count a “commercial minute” and start creating some truly engaging ads. I don’t mean ads that show a bear getting hit in the groin by a hammer-wielding Burt Reynolds. I mean ads that are going to compel me to not only buy the product advertised but watch the ad in the first place. I know this might seem odd to some of you but I think it’s worth a shot.

Lost Remote – http://www.lostremote.com/2006/09/27/what-happens-during-commercial-breaks/

by Cory Bergman

Ball State’s Center for Media Design conducted a study to find out what really happens when viewers are confronted with a commecial break. About 45 percent of the breaks were interrupted by either channel changes, program guide surfing or leaving the room. Call it old-fashioned commercial skipping. Study follows…

PRESS RELEASE — MUNCIE, Ind. – The good news for the advertising industry is that nearly a third of television commercial breaks are watched from start to finish during prime time, but the bad news is half are watched for 60 seconds or less, says a new study by Ball State University.

The results are from “Remotely Interested: Exploring TV Viewers Advertising-Related Behaviors,” a behavioral study that was unveiled Sept. 27 by Ball State’s Center for Media Design (CMD) research staff in New York at the Forecast 2007 Conference: Media on Internet Speed.

“The debate to define a commercial minute is currently a major point of discussion for advertisers, media owners and agencies,” said Mike Bloxham, CMD’s director of insight and research. “This study has enabled us to provide insights to what really happens during an average person’s prime-time viewing such as the percentage of commercial breaks we observed where attention was compromised through channel-changing, using another medium like a magazine, talking to someone else in the room or leaving the room altogether.

“Watching television is not as simple as it seems at face value,” he said. “There are a number of choices that viewers can make that compound the complexity of ‘watching television.’ If advertisers and media owners want to keep up with these changes, they need to understand complex human behavior, which will only become more complex as we have more options available to us on screen.”

CMD researchers shadowed 49 Muncie and Indianapolis area residents in their homes as they watched three to four hours of prime-time television. The average observation was 3.7 hours, resulting in 179.2 observed viewing hours.

Researchers gathered data via touch-screen devices that allowed observers to record, in five-second increments, changes in channel, television content types, use of the electronic programming guide (EPG) and other behaviors.

The study found:

The average ad break exposure was 2.2 minutes with 32.7 percent of the study’s ad breaks watched in their entirety

Nearly half of the ad breaks were watched for one minute or less with 15.4 percent of commercial blocks viewed for 31 to 60 seconds before interruption; 12.1 percent lasted 16 to 30 seconds; 11.8 percent were between 6 to 10 seconds; and 9.1 percent lasted 5 seconds or less

About 45 percent of advertising breaks were interrupted by scene-shifting behaviors, including channel changes (50.5 percent of scene shifts), EPG use (31 percent) and leaving the room (18.5 percent).

“Obviously it’s good news for advertisers that nearly a third of the observed ad breaks were watched from start to finish,” he said. “On the other hand, it is not so good where viewers are only watching part of a commercial break. If their attention has been lost in less than a minute, advertisers need that much more airtime to reach the kind of numbers they want often enough to stand a chance of getting their message through.”

More information about the study and other CMD research is available at http://www.bsu.edu/cmd/insightresearch.

Inside INdiana Businesshttp://www.insideindianabusiness.com/newsitem.asp?ID=19829

The good news for advertisers-nearly a third of television commercial breaks are watched from start to finish during prime time. The bad news – half are watched for 60 seconds or less.

Press Release

MUNCIE, Ind. – The good news for the advertising industry is that nearly a third of television commercial breaks are watched from start to finish during prime time, but the bad news is half are watched for 60 seconds or less, says a new study by Ball State University.

The results are from “Remotely Interested: Exploring TV Viewers Advertising-Related Behaviors,” a behavioral study that was unveiled Sept. 27 by Ball State’s Center for Media Design (CMD) research staff in New York at the Forecast 2007 Conference: Media on Internet Speed.

“The debate to define a commercial minute is currently a major point of discussion for advertisers, media owners and agencies,” said Mike Bloxham, CMD’s director of insight and research. “This study has enabled us to provide insights to what really happens during an average person’s prime-time viewing such as the percentage of commercial breaks we observed where attention was compromised through channel-changing, using another medium like a magazine, talking to someone else in the room or leaving the room altogether.

“Watching television is not as simple as it seems at face value,” he said. “There are a number of choices that viewers can make that compound the complexity of ‘watching television.’ If advertisers and media owners want to keep up with these changes, they need to understand complex human behavior, which will only become more complex as we have more options available to us on screen.”

CMD researchers shadowed 49 Muncie and Indianapolis area residents in their homes as they watched three to four hours of prime-time television. The average observation was 3.7 hours, resulting in 179.2 observed viewing hours.

Researchers gathered data via touch-screen devices that allowed observers to record, in five-second increments, changes in channel, television content types, use of the electronic programming guide (EPG) and other behaviors.

The study found:

-The average ad break exposure was 2.2 minutes with 32.7 percent of the study’s ad breaks watched in their entirety
-Nearly half of the ad breaks were watched for one minute or less with 15.4 percent of commercial blocks viewed for 31 to 60 seconds before interruption; 12.1 percent lasted 16 to 30 seconds; 11.8 percent were between 6 to 10 seconds; and 9.1 percent lasted 5 seconds or less
-About 45 percent of advertising breaks were interrupted by scene-shifting behaviors, including channel changes (50.5 percent of scene shifts), EPG use (31 percent) and leaving the room (18.5 percent)

Inside Indiana Business

“Obviously it’s good news for advertisers that nearly a third of the observed ad breaks were watched from start to finish,” he said. “On the other hand, it is not so good where viewers are only watching part of a commercial break. If their attention has been lost in less than a minute, advertisers need that much more airtime to reach the kind of numbers they want often enough to stand a chance of getting their message through.”

More information about the study and other CMD research is available at http://www.bsu.edu/cmd/insightresearch.

Source: Ball State University

Insdie INdiana businesshttp://www.insideindianabusiness.com/video-player.asp?id=4674

Michelle Prieb, Lead Researcher, talks about a new behavioral study that explores what really takes place during an average person’s prime time TV hours.

The video and audio excerpts are licensed for private, non-commercial use only. Any other use is strictly prohibited without the expressed, written permission of Grow Indiana Media Ventures, LLC. Duplication in whole or part of the video or audio contained within is strictly prohibited. All other rights reserved.

MediaPost MediaDailyNews  http://www.mediapost.com/publications/index.cfm?fuseaction=Articles.san&s=47799&Nid=23107&p=216556

by Tom Siebert

Marketers, take note: This year’s college class carries a certain distinction–the most wired.

 

 

Data released yesterday from the Alloy Media + Marketing’s 2006 College Explorer Study, in tandem with Harris Interactive, shows that 2006’s campus class is the largest in history, at 17.4 million. It also carries a record number of gadgets to keep students connected in dorms, classrooms and commons. Read the rest of this entry »

Who Are We

Insight and Research at the Center for Media Design (CMD) has begun to receive quite a bit of attention from industry publications and mainstream media outlets in the last several years as a groundbreaking and reputable media research organization. This archive is only for educational purpose, if the content involved any copyright issue, please contact: Michelle Prieb: meprieb@bsu.edu
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