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AjaxWorld Magazine/ SYS-CON Mediahttp://ca.sys-con.com/node/894355

By PR Newswire

Traditional Television Remains “800 Pound Gorilla” In Video Media Arena

NEW YORK, March 26 /PRNewswire/ — A pioneering study conducted on behalf of the Nielsen-funded Council for Research Excellence (CRE) by Ball State University’s Center for Media Design (CMD) and Sequent Partners dispels several popular notions about video media use, finding that younger baby boomers (age 45-54) consume the most video media while confirming that traditional “live” television remains the proverbial “800 pound gorilla” in the video media arena. (See appendix for more detail.)

Results of the $3.5 million year-long Video Consumer Mapping (VCM) study, in which participants were directly observed throughout the day by CMD researchers, were released to the media industry today by representatives of the CRE, Nielsen, Ball State and the analytical firm Sequent. Read the rest of this entry »

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Nielsen Wirehttp://blog.nielsen.com/nielsenwire/consumer/how-consumers-use-media-rethinking-conventional-wisdom/

by Susan D. Whiting, Vice Chair & Executive Vice President, The Nielsen Company

Of the myriad challenges confronting the television industry, the much-discussed defection by viewers to online and mobile platforms may be the most comforting; simply because it hasn’t happened. Despite the profusion of multimedia computers, broadband Internet connections and portable video devices, the overwhelming majority of Americans are staying right where they are – in front of their TV sets inside their homes. Read the rest of this entry »

TV by the Numbershttp://tvbythenumbers.com/2009/03/26/nielsen-funded-video-mapping-shows-young-boomers-consume-most-video-media/15250

by Robert Seidman

Nielsen press release:

GROUND-BREAKING STUDY OF VIDEO VIEWING FINDS YOUNGER BOOMERS

CONSUME MORE VIDEO MEDIA THAN ANY OTHER GROUP

Traditional Television Remains “800 Pound Gorilla” In Video Media Arena

NEW YORK, NY – March 26, 2009 – A pioneering study conducted on behalf of the Nielsen-funded Council for Research Excellence (CRE) by Ball State University’s Center for Media Design (CMD) and Sequent Partners dispels several popular notions about video media use, finding that younger baby boomers (age 45-54) consume the most video media while confirming that traditional “live” television remains the proverbial “800 pound gorilla” in the video media arena. (See appendix for more detail.)

Results of the $3.5 million year-long Video Consumer Mapping (VCM) study, in which participants were directly observed throughout the day by CMD researchers, were released to the media industry today by representatives of the CRE, Nielsen, Ball State and the analytical firm Sequent. Read the rest of this entry »

The Ad Contrarianhttp://adcontrarian.blogspot.com/2009/03/facts-still-matter-death-and-life-of.html

The New York Times, March 26, 2009: “Even though people have the opportunity to watch video on their computers and cellphones, TV accounts for 99 percent of all video consumed in 2008…”
This is a story about a story. A story that has been repeated so many times, in so many places, with so much zeal, that it has taken on a life of its own — despite the fact that it is false.

The theme of the story is that television is dying.

It is a story built on shabby journalism, ad industry buffoonery, and the willful suspension of skepticism on a scale unprecedented during my time in the advertising business.

This story has been advanced by a gullible press, confused advertising and marketing executives, web promoters, and careless pundits caught in a feedback loop of such proportions that it’s possible it has done serious harm to the media and advertising industries.

Last week, in a remarkable turn of events, the story was exposed as a complete fraud.

Live television has proven to be astonishingly, amazingly dominant.

In “the largest observational look at media usage ever conducted” researchers at Ball State University’s Center for Media Design, found the following:
99% of video viewing was done on a television in the past year.
Less than 5% of TV viewing was DVR (TiVo) playback.
YouTube, Hulu, iPhone and all other web and cellphone media combined accounted for less than 1% of video viewing
The wonderful thing about this study is that it isn’t the typical “self-reported” nonsense. This is actual observed behavior.

If that’s not enough…
Nielsen reported last month that TV viewing is at its highest point in history. Ever.
Since ad-skipping among DVR users occurs about half the time, fewer than 3% of total ads are being missed because of ad skipping.
TV viewing has risen at least 7% since 2000 which means the positive effect of more TV viewing is double the negative effect of DVR ad-skipping.
Let’s see how these facts stack up against a tiny sampling of the commentary on this subject:

From TechCrunch, November 2006 “Let’s Just Declare TV Dead And Move On”
…the writing is on the wall…at the end of the day, people want to consume content without the friction of having to sit down in front of a television at an appointed time….People want to see the whole show on YouTube. There is a fundamental shift in consumer behavior going on…
From Wired, April 2007: “The TV Is Dead. Long Live The TV”
“Traditional TV won’t be here in seven to 10 years…It’s changing so fast that I don’t know if it’s even going to be that long.”
From The Telegraph, 2007, “TV Is Dying Says Google Expert”
One of the founding fathers of the internet has predicted the end of traditional television….Vint Cerf, who helped to build the internet… said…that viewers would soon be downloading most of their favourite programmes onto their computers.
From Ad Age, 2008, “TiVo CEO Says End Is Nigh for TV Ads”
TiVo CEO Tom Rogers did everything but hang an “end is near” sign around his neck… with warnings of fast-approaching doom for conventional TV ads… “Probably two thirds or more of the households advertisers care about reaching will be fast forwarding through television ads…”
Unfortunately, we don’t have room for all 124,000 citations Google has for “TV is dead.”

The Ad Contrarian has been screaming for years (okay, a year and a half) about the falseness of this pervasive story.

The people advancing this “narrative” live in a bubble of people-like-them. They are mesmerized by the web. They are suffering from nascar blindness. They have lost their perspective.

How will this new study change things? Not one bit.
These people are so heavily invested in their story that facts don’t matter to them anymore. They will respond to this study the way they have responded to every contradictory piece of factual evidence for 5 years, “…just wait, you’ll see…”
This study will disappear from view in a week. The advertising agency business is too solidly committed to the fraud. They’ll just bury this report and hope their clients don’t see it.
There is not one CMO in the world who will go back to his management and say, “I was wrong. I got swept up in the hysteria. TV is kicking ass. It’s different from how it used to be, but it’s kicking ass. Instead of wasting our money chasing rainbows we need to figure out how to use TV more effectively.”
The story will live on.

Tomorrow…
What should we do about this?

Media Bizhttp://www.mediabiz.com/news/morningbridge/?edit_id=11364

Key findings from the soon to be released “Video Consumer Mapping Study” will be revealed at the CTAM Research Conference taking place in Washington, D.C., April 5 – 7. This study, conducted by Ball State University and Sequent Partners, is the largest and most significant observational study of media activity ever undertaken.  It is also the first known source to document consumers’ media behaviors across various screens from a single sample, and to quantify sole media use versus media multitasking. Read the rest of this entry »

Podcasting News – http://www.podcastingnews.com/2009/03/26/baby-boomers-biggest-couch-potatoes-mouse-potatoes/

By James Lewin

Forget worrying about how much video the kids are watching these days on the TV and the Internet – new research shows that Baby Boomers are the biggest couch potatoes/mouse potatoes of all.

A $3.5 million, year-long Video Consumer Mapping (VCM) study found that younger baby boomers (age 45-54) consume the most video media, and confirmed that traditional “live” television remains the proverbial “800-pound gorilla” in the video media arena. Read the rest of this entry »

Ad Weekhttp://www.adweek.com/aw/content_display/news/agency/e3i6011385516f3bdfb06da76701a42c29a

By Mark Dolliver

NEW YORK Despite the proliferation of things to watch via computer and mobile device, “traditional ‘live’ television remains the proverbial ‘800-pound gorilla’ of the video media arena.” So says a study conducted by Ball State University’s Center for Media Design and Sequent Partners. (The research was conducted on behalf of the Council for Research Excellence, funded by Adweek parent the Nielsen Co.) Read the rest of this entry »

The New York Timeshttp://www.nytimes.com/2009/03/27/business/media/27adco.html

By BRIAN STELTER

IN a world with grocery store television screens, digitally delivered movie libraries and cellphone video clips, the average American is exposed to 61 minutes of TV ads and promotions a day.

Some people may think that amount seems excessive. But “people don’t seem to be getting up and running away,” said Jack Wakshlag, chief research officer at Turner Broadcasting.

In fact, adults are exposed to screens — TVs, cellphones, even G.P.S. devices — for about 8.5 hours on any given day, according to a study released by the Council for Research Excellence on Thursday. TV remains the dominant medium for media consumption and advertising, the study found. The data suggests that computer usage has supplanted radio as the second most common media activity. (Print ranks fourth.) Read the rest of this entry »

TV Weekhttp://www.tvweek.com/news/2009/03/young_boomers_watch_95_hours_o.php

by Jon Lafayette

Live viewing on television still is the dominant form of video consumption in the United States.

A new study conducted by Ball State University’s Center for Media Design and Sequent Partners for the Nielsen-funded Council for Research Excellence, found that 99% of video consumption on televisions, the Web and mobile is on traditional TVs. Even among adults 18 to 24, 98% of video is seen on televisions. Read the rest of this entry »

Broadcasting & Cablehttp://www.broadcastingcable.com/article/190737-Research_Report_Youngsters_Not_Abandoning_Live_TV.php

by Claire Atkinson

A $3.5 billion one year research study into where and how people seek out video, reveals today that the extent to which young people are abandoning live television for new media has been by overestimated.

According to the Video Consumer Mapping Study—conducted by the Council for Research Excellence, a cross-industry think tank of top executives from agencies and TV networks—people aged between 18-24 watched only 5.5 minutes of ‘computer video,’ daily compared with 209.9 minutes of live television. DVR playback accounted for 17.2 minutes a day. Across all ages groups, live television still accounted for 309.1 minutes of viewing a day compared to only 14.6 minutes of playback TV and 2.4 minutes daily spent watching online video. Read the rest of this entry »

Who Are We

Insight and Research at the Center for Media Design (CMD) has begun to receive quite a bit of attention from industry publications and mainstream media outlets in the last several years as a groundbreaking and reputable media research organization. This archive is only for educational purpose, if the content involved any copyright issue, please contact: Michelle Prieb: meprieb@bsu.edu
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