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MediaPost Magazines

by Joe Mandese

This column is labeled “Fast Forward,” but all too frequently, I feel like I’m stuck on pause. That’s the way I felt recently when I paid a visit to Muncie, Indiana. What’s that you say, “Muncie?”

Yeah, well, if you don’t recall, or never read the story I wrote about my first visit to the media visionaries on the campus of Ball State University in Muncie, you can find it on our magazine archives page on MediaPost.com, but let me remind you now that the school is the home to some really smart people and forward-thinking media research and experiments, especially the emerging kind. In fact, the Center for Media Design that I visited four years ago has actually morphed into an array of “Emerging Media Initiatives,” some of which I got to see firsthand as a fly-on-the-wall of a recent meeting in which the university was exploring “commercializing” some of its classroom and faculty projects. I just want to share with you that some pretty advanced thinking about the future of media is taking place there. Read the rest of this entry »

MediaPost Media Magazine

by Mike Bloxham

The nanopossibilities of onboarding

It’s integral to human nature that we ask questions. Similarly, it’s pretty much always the case that once an answer is supplied, it spawns yet more questions. It’s part of the human condition.

The advent of new technologies and media capabilities has extended this craving for information to the point that ever-more complex and intricate media research processes are required in an attempt to keep up with what an outsider might consider an almost pathological pursuit of data. Read the rest of this entry »

As television looks to the future, it fights to hang onto its alpha-media status

Media Magazine

by Wayne Friedman

When Jeremy Allaire, chairman and CEO of Brightcove, started his online television technology company a few years ago, he believed an open video distribution system would emerge – thus bypassing traditional programming distribution systems to the TV set. Not so fast.

“What we quickly learned when we built our platform in 2005 was that it was a long ways away,” he says. “It did not work for consumers.” Instead, what developed was a land grab to capture the mindshare of Internet users. “The product was a very different kind of product than you get in broadcast – snacking on content, short-form video.”

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Media Magazine

by Mike Bloxham

It’s in the nature of the media and communications industries that those employed in them spend inordinate amounts of time deeply immersed in its minutiae. The effort and intellectual capital that goes into such things on a daily basis is almost suggestive of obsession. While at its best – and such effort undoubtedly pays off to varying degrees – it is, in all cases, at odds with the amount of time and attention consumers give those efforts and the brands they intend to promote. Read the rest of this entry »

Media Magazine

by Steve Smith

Even though nobody seems to know exactly what “high-definition” actually means, American gadgeteers and marketers apparently lust for turning that technology “one louder” in every pursuit. The cult of high definition is upon us. Everywhere we look (indoor or out), and everywhere we listen, hd is the new “all new and improved,” the new “digital,” the new sticker applied to all products to define that next level of inevitable technical perfection –
the new “11.”

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Media Magazine

by Mike Bloxham

As a general rule, we like to think of ourselves as individuals who make our own choices and decisions. Sure, we’re informed by the factors around us, but, ultimately, we’re independent of them. Mavericks, if you will. The reality, of course, is far less simple. Many of our choices are heavily influenced – if not predetermined – by what we have been exposed to throughout our lives by family, friends and others around us. Leaving aside for now that, by definition, we can’t all be mavericks, just how maverick can we be? Read the rest of this entry »

Media Magazine

by Mike Bloxham

As a general rule, we like to think of ourselves as individuals who make our own choices and decisions. Sure, we’re informed by the factors around us, but, ultimately, we’re independent of them. Mavericks, if you will. The reality, of course, is far less simple. Many of our choices are heavily influenced – if not predetermined – by what we have been exposed to throughout our lives by family, friends and others around us. Leaving aside for now that, by definition, we can’t all be mavericks, just how maverick can we be?
Read the rest of this entry »

MediaPost Magazine  http://www.mediapost.com/publications/index.cfm?fa=Articles.showArticle&art_aid=93743

by Mike Bloxham

Pretty much however you choose to measure the time we spend with media – whether self-reported, metered, observed or some combination of these – the time the average person spends with media each day has increased markedly. Bearing in mind the explosion of choices and platforms over the last 30 to 40 years, this is entirely understandable. Probably the simplest way to characterize the development of media over that time is to sum it up in one word – more. Read the rest of this entry »

Media Magazine  http://www.mediapost.com/publications/?fa=Articles.showArticleHomePage&art_aid=91920

by J. Walker Smith

Eulogizing old media is a favorite pastime for pundits nowadays. Not so fast. Sure, things may look bleak. Newspaper advertising seems to have hit its long-anticipated tipping point and is in record declines. The network upfronts held their own this year, but only because advertisers bought more spots to offset declining audiences, so networks sold more inventory. Magazine advertising is taking an extra hit this year because of the slow economy.

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MediaPost’s Media Magazine http://www.mediapost.com/publications/index.cfm?fuseaction=articles.showarticlehomepage&art_aid=83049

by Liz Tascio

As the screens keep multiplying, content roams free

Dramatic changes in media overthrew the old models, and consumers took control: Nomadic media takes the evolution one giant step farther.

 

He’s broken free. Smart phones. Wireless connections. Thumb drives that hold a small library of information on a keychain. Internet cafés. With the adoption of smarter and smarter tools, consumers have leveraged their own liberation. The modern consumer is ever more mobile, untethered to media schedules, to heavy PCs, to offices, even to traveling itself. They are not physically tied to any one place: not the office, not the classroom, not the television. Consumers take pieces of increasingly fragmenting media and run with them – wherever they feel like it. They can work and play at will, whether they are world travelers or dedicated suburbanites. Read the rest of this entry »

Who Are We

Insight and Research at the Center for Media Design (CMD) has begun to receive quite a bit of attention from industry publications and mainstream media outlets in the last several years as a groundbreaking and reputable media research organization. This archive is only for educational purpose, if the content involved any copyright issue, please contact: Michelle Prieb: meprieb@bsu.edu
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