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Broadcast Engineering

Could the widely held belief that TV viewers, by and large, switch channels or leave the room when commercials are on be all wrong?

That’s the conclusion of a recent Video Consumer Mapping (VCM) study sponsored by the Council for Research Excellence.

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RICG

It’s a common belief that most people either change the channel or leave the room during television commercials. But a new study finds this may be just a myth.

According to the Video Consumer Mapping study, conducted by the Council for Research Excellence, the large majority of TV viewers – 86 percent – actually remain with live TV during commercial breaks instead of leaving the room or changing the channel.
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Participant

This is a great article on a Video Consumer Mapping (VCM) study sponsored by the Council for Research Excellence (CRE). Although it does not go into brand and messaging detail, it is important for all advertisers and marketers to realize people ARE watching television commercials. However, many brands are finding that their commercials are not working as well as they hoped. As you can see below, this is not a matter of media and whether or not the commercial was viewed, it has to do with how relevant and engaging your message and call to action is to your intended audience.

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Nielsen Wire

It’s always been conventional wisdom that people watching TV don’t watch commercials. They flip channels, get something to eat or otherwise ignore the ads. In fact, it turns out the conventional wisdom is all wrong: TV advertising and program promotions reach 85% of adults daily, and viewers typically see 26 advertising or promotional breaks — accounting for 73 minutes — each day.

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Mediapost’s Media Daily News

New dramatic research suggests the majority of viewers don’t leave the room during commercial breaks — or even change channels.

What are they doing? It may come as a shock to TV marketers that have been told otherwise: Viewers are watching TV commercials.

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Broadcase Engineering

There’s no place like home, unless you’re a young adult viewer, according to a recent Nielsen analysis of the Video Consumer Mapping Study conducted by the Council for Research Excellence (CRE). Nielsen found that adults 18 to 34 are 26 percent more likely to be exposed to live TV away from home than people ages 35-54 and 13 percent more likely than those over 55. Being younger affects what viewers watch while away as well (more sports and entertainment programming), while older viewers outside the house tend toward news.

At other people’s houses, people tend to watch entertainment and informational programs (53 percent of viewing minutes). But in restaurants, bars and stores, 38 percent of all viewing minutes are devoted to sports. Meanwhile, viewers at work split live TV minutes viewed evenly across sports, entertainment, news and advertising.

On another front, QuickPlay Media’s third annual survey on U.S. mobile TV and video consumption indicates high interest in new TV and video entertainment delivery models, pinpointing multiscreen video services. More than 50 percent of respondents were interested in services that let them seamlessly switch between multiple devices, such as PCs and smartphones, when watching programs.

Marketing For Nerds via Nielsen Wire

Younger adult viewers tend to watch more live television out of home than older viewers, according to a Nielsen analysis of the Video Consumer Mapping study (.pdf) “Out of Home Television and Other Video Behaviors of U.S. Adults” conducted by the Council for Research Excellence (CRE). Nielsen found that  adults age 18-34 are 26% more likely to be exposed to live TV out of home than 35-54 and 13% more likely than 55+.

Marketing Charts

What adults 18 and older prefer to watch on TV depends on where they are, according to Nielsen analysis of the Video Consumer Mapping Study [pdf] from the Council for Research Excellence.

Entertainment Rules at Home
At home, people show a preference for entertainment programming. Almost half of home viewing (48.2%) consists of entertainment programming. Advertising and promotions accounts for another 21.9% of home viewing. News follows with 18.3% of home viewing time. Sports comes in last with a 10.7% share of home viewing.

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Nielsen Wire

Younger adult viewers tend to watch more live television out of home than older viewers, according to a Nielsen analysis of the Video Consumer Mapping study conducted by the Council for Research Excellence (CRE). Nielsen found that  adults age 18-34 are 26% more likely to be exposed to live TV out of home than 35-54 and 13% more likely than 55+.

What a viewer chooses to watch on TV outside the home is also a function of his or her age. In general, Nielsen found that younger out-of-home TV viewers watched more sports and entertainment programming, while older viewers outside the home skewed toward news broadcasts.

The CRE study was conducted by observing the media usage among participants age 18 years and older in five DMAs (Atlanta, Chicago, Dallas, Philadelphia, and Seattle) in the spring and fall of 2008. The sample included 752 observed days for a total of approximately 750,000 recorded minutes.

A detailed look at the data lends insight into what people like to watch in different out-of-home locations. Entertainment and informational programming, for example, is most prominent at other people’s homes (52.6% of  viewing minutes). But in restaurants, bars, and stores, 38% of all viewing minutes are devoted to sports programming. Meanwhile, viewers at work are equally split (in terms of live TV minutes viewed) between sports, entertainment, news, and advertising.

While viewers might be able to watch TV at out-of-home locations, they may not necessarily be able to hear what’s on screen. About one-quarter of live TV viewed at work is muted while almost 22% of bar and restaurant viewing takes place without sound. Only about one percent of viewing inside the home or at another person’s home is muted.

Download the full report Out of Home Television and Other Video Behaviors of U.S. Adults here.

IPA

Mediamark Research & Intelligence (MRI) and the Media Behavior Institute (MBI) today (1st March 2010) announced a strategic partnership with the goal of jointly launching a syndicated, consumer-centric, multimedia database that could transform the way media is planned, bought and sold in the US. MRI and MBI are building on a research methodology pioneered by the Institute of Practitioners in Advertising (IPA), the United Kingdom’s leading organisation for advertising, media and marketing communications agencies. Launched in 2006, the IPA TouchPoints© initiative now serves more than 50 companies in the U.K.

The announcement was made at the Transformation 2010 conference of the American Association of Advertising Agencies, held at the Hilton San Francisco Union Square Hotel.

MRI and MBI are building on a research methodology pioneered by the Institute of Practitioners in Advertising (IPA), the United Kingdom’s leading organisation for advertising, media and marketing communications agencies. Launched in 2006, the IPA TouchPoints© initiative now serves more than 50 companies in the U.K.

“Our goal is to create a U.S. database of consumer activity that can serve as a hub of information on all the factors that could affect a consumer’s receptivity to a brand message,” said Kathi Love, President and CEO of MRI.

Formed in 2008, MBI has exclusively licensed the IPA TouchPoints© name and methodology for use in the United States. MRI and MBI intend to create a USA TouchPoints© study that will help marketers target consumers within the context of their daily lives. USA TouchPoints© will offer detailed attitudinal, category and brand purchase behavior for consumers via MRI’s extensive Survey of the American Consumer information, enabling marketers to target the right audience for their products and services when, where and while engaged in the activities that render them most receptive to marketers’ messages.  USA TouchPoints© will cast a uniquely granular light on how media are used throughout the day and week; it will show precisely when, for instance, consumers are using media alone, using several media concurrently and using media concurrent with another life activity. Read the rest of this entry »

Who Are We

Insight and Research at the Center for Media Design (CMD) has begun to receive quite a bit of attention from industry publications and mainstream media outlets in the last several years as a groundbreaking and reputable media research organization. This archive is only for educational purpose, if the content involved any copyright issue, please contact: Michelle Prieb: meprieb@bsu.edu
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